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‘Businesses’ Category

Have a Bash

Monday, June 15th, 2015

From Unforgettable Columbus, volume 2: “Although Herb Bash is not considered a pro, he did give lessons and was considered a pretty fair golfer. [Early on, he leased Indian Springs Golf Course.] In 1948 he opened a unique golfing complex on W. Dodridge St. between Olentangy River and the Olentangy River Rd. These 60 acres consisted of an 18-hole golf course and a large driving range. He sold the land in 1962 to Chemical Abstracts and moved his entire operation to just beyond Rte 161 on Dublin Road…The driving range on Dodridge was a place where many a Columbus duffer sharpened his game. Bash died in 1979 at the age of 86.”

According to Bill Case’s web site, “former South High coach Herb Bash … made his living in the golf industry. Herb and his wife owned the Berwick Golf Course, a public facility located on the city’s southeast side. Herb helped grow the game at Berwick by conducting numerous golf clinics for the city’s youths. Shortly after joining The Elks’ in 1928, Bash, in partnership with Bugs Raymond, opened another golf course- Indian Springs, opposite Henderson Road on the east side of High Street. Herb later added the “Bash Driving Range” in Dublin to his collection of entrepreneurial golf activities. Like many of his compatriots at Elks’-Wyandot, Herb Bash could golf his ball. Prior to joining The Elks’, he won Dublin Road’s club championship. Herb was also a mainstay of the 1932 Wyandot golf team which won the inter-club championship.” [Image courtesy of Bill Case.]

Beechwold Theatre

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

This is an ad that just happens to show the signage of the old Beechwold Theatre at 4250 N. High (aka Camelot North and Drexel North, and currently an athletic club).

The theatre was built by the F & Y Building Service (aka F & Y Construction Company). Mark Fontana informs me that the “Y” in this name is Yassenoff, and the first manager of the Beechwold Theatre was Milton Yassenoff, adopted son of Leo Yassenoff.

If anyone out there is aware of the whereabouts of blueprints, construction photos and high-res b/w photos of the finished theater, please let us know! The ad was shared with me by Mark Fontana, former manager of the Drexel North (aka Camelot North and Beechwold Theater) Mark is a collector. In another place on this web site I link to his web site.

Sewer pipe factory, and The Mystery of the Pond

Thursday, December 26th, 2013

John Krygier found a few maps that he was kind enough to share with us: 3 Sanborn maps of the sewer pipe factory (and later, brick yard) formerly occupying the area where old North High currently sits at 100 Arcadia. Interestingly, the ravine behind the factory was apparently dammed, making a significant (and the only?) pond in Clintonville (not sure if the one in Whetstone counts). John requests that if anyone knows of any other sources documenting this pond, to let him know. You can do that by commenting on this post and I will send it along to John.

John also found a map showing the rail grade that connected the sewer pipe factory to the main RR line to the east. The interurban (Columbus, Marion and Delaware) used part of that spur (north of Glen Echo Park) as a bypass.
This Worthington Bypass went from Indianola Ave, east along the top of Glen Echo, then north up what is now the alley along the RR track, then curved west at North Broadway over to and running parallel along Indianola. This curve is preserved in some of the lots around Oakland Park–in particular, the odd orientation of the IndiaOak Tavern is the result of it being built on a curved parcel, part of the old RR right of way. A map of current parcels (with the approximate route of the RR grade) is also attached.

There are 7 photos of this Worthington bypass around the time it was built, showing the eastern end of C-ville at the time, at this web site.

Thanks, John!

(Photos courtesy of John Krygier)

Clintonville Community Market

Thursday, December 26th, 2013

It’s always fun to research the history of your home or building, using the Franklin County Auditor’s web site to look at the “transfer history” aka assessment history. John Krygier recently shared the history of the building occupied by the Clintonville Community Market and you’ll find it here. (Courtesy John Krygier)

Weisheimer Mill

Thursday, December 26th, 2013

Another great image of Weisheimer Mill! The verso of this photograph says, “Looking east across the Olentangy River at the Weisheimer Mill N. of Henderson Rd Columbus, Ohio. House and shed are still there at end of Weisheimer Road. (Photo courtesy of Galen Gonser)

David Beers

Wednesday, November 5th, 2008

David Beers was another early pioneer with an exciting life story of having been captured and released by the Native Americans. Beers came to Ohio in 1802. Descendents of David Beers still live in the area to the present day. (Photo courtesy of Terry Miller)

Beers had a log house near the intersection of Dodridge and North High Street. The cabin still exists but has been moved to Norwich Avenue. This photo appeared in the December 29, 1904 Dispatch, on the house’s centennial. The people included friends, relatives, and associates of the cabin’s next owner, Conn Baker, and they were reminiscing with him about early Columbus and marking the 100th anniversary of the cabin after the its move and reassembly to E. Norwich.

The Beers family operated a mill which existed until the early twentieth century. For many years the father of the well-known poet John James Piatt operated it. The future poet spent his boyhood days playing about the mill, and some say that the impressions made by its surroundings found expression in his work. The mill was considered to be one of the most picturesque spots in Ohio. Built around 1810, the mill burned in 1902.

There are still vestiges of the mill (foundation stones) below North Street, at the river.

The reason for this gathering is unknown, but it includes several Beers descendants (and likely many who are not related) and was taken about 1905, probably at Olentangy Park. (Photos courtesy of Marty Cottrill)

Whip family

Friday, October 10th, 2008

One of the oldest families in Clintonville is the Whipp Family (sometimes spelled Whip). They owned a farm, and a couple of stands along High Street that had big large orange signs advertising a refreshing drink consisting of freshly squeezed orange juice. The Whipps may have been the first owners of the mill located just north of Henderson Road and the Olentangy River. Here is a picture of the Whipp family circa 1889: George, Oscar, Everett, Laura, Cora, and Mabel. (Photo courtesy of Sue Gallogly)

The Whips lived at 73 East Weisheimer.

Bottled water back then?

Saturday, October 4th, 2008

Pearl Fisher lived at 129 West Pacemont for nearly 70 years until her death in 1970 at age 82. [The house has since been torn down.] She moved there as a young girl, when Pacemont (then called Jason Avenue), was a gravel road with houses far apart and the mailman traveled his route in a buggy. There was a spring on the West Pacemont farm which her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fisher, owned. They sold this spring water in bottles to residents all over Clintonville, delivering it by horse-drawn wagon. They stored the bottles in a little shed attached to the house. –from The Booster, January 4, 1978.

The Jones’ of North Columbus

Friday, October 3rd, 2008

C. F. Jones Grocer used to be located at 2581 North High Street, where Schreiner’s Hardware Store is now. This image was taken around 1904 inside of the Jones Grocery Store. Shown are sons Charles and Clarence with their father Frank Jones.
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This image of their delivery wagon dates from 1909. Charles Jones is besides the wagon and the young man holding the horse is unknown. They are standing in front of their store.
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This photo of the C. F. Jones Grocer Co. was taken around 1916. Shown are Charles, Clarence, and their father Frank Jones.
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This is a picture of the C. Frank Jones family in their home at 2665 Adams Avenue, Columbus, circa 1900. Bertha May Jones Aurand (1889-1934), Charles M. Jones (1895-1956), C. Frank Jones (1861-1937), Clarence A. Jones (1891-1950), Miriam Tozer Jones (1869-1941), Gladys A. Jones Reiger (1899-1930). (Photos courtesy of Frank Jones.)

J. T. Herrick Saloon

Friday, October 3rd, 2008

Ed Herrick’s saloon, at 2568 North High Street in 1900. (Photo courtesy of Frank Jones.)